World’s Largest Law Firms

This list of the world’s largest law firms by revenue is taken from The American Lawyer and is ordered by 2010 revenue:

Rank Name Revenue Office Reach Headquarters
1 increase Baker & McKenzie $2,104.0m International United States US
2 increase Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom $2,100.0m International United States US
3 steady Clifford Chance $1,874.5m International United Kingdom UK
4 decrease Linklaters $1,852.5m International United Kingdom UK
5 increase Latham & Watkins $1,821.0m International United States USA
6 decrease Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer $1,787.0m International United Kingdom UK
7 decrease Allen & Overy $1,644.5m International United Kingdom UK
8 steady Jones Day $1,520.0m International United States USA
9 increase Kirkland & Ellis $1,428.0m International United States USA
10 decrease Sidley Austin $1,357.0m International United States USA
11 decrease White & Case $1,307.0m International United States USA
12 increase Weil Gotshal $1,233.0m International United States USA
13 increase Greenberg Traurig $1,173.0m National? United States USA
14 decrease Mayer Brown $1,118.0m International United States USA
15 increase Morgan, Lewis & Bockius $1,068.5m International United States USA
16 increase K&L Gates $1,034.5m International United States USA
17 decrease DLA Piper USA $1,014.5m National… United States USA
18 increase Gibson Dunn $995.0m International United States USA
18 increase Sullivan & Cromwell $995.0m International United States USA
20 increase Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton $965.0m International United States USA
21 increase Reed Smith $942.0m International United States USA
22 increase WilmerHale $941.0m International United States USA
23 decrease Dewey & LeBoeuf $941.0m International United States USA
24 decrease DLA Piper International $910.0m International United Kingdom UK
25 decrease Paul, Hastings, Janofsky & Walker $889.0m National? United States USA
26 increase Morrison & Foerster $884.0m National? United States USA
27 decrease Simpson Thacher & Bartlett $870.5m National? United States USA
28 steady Hogan & Hartson $864.5m National United States USA
29 increase Bingham McCutchen $860.0m International United States USA
30 decrease Lovells[3] $849.0m International United Kingdom UK
31 increase Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe $847.5m International United States USA
32 increase Davis Polk & Wardwell $846.0m International United States USA
33 decrease McDermott Will & Emery $829.0m International United States USA
34 decrease O’Melveny & Myers $826.5m International United States USA
35 decrease Shearman & Sterling $801.0m International United States USA
36 increase Ropes & Gray $789.5m International United States USA
37 increase Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld $719.0m International United States USA
38 decrease Dechert $713.0m International United States USA
39 increase Winston & Strawn $705.0m International United States USA
40 decrease Herbert Smith $704.5m International United Kingdom UK
41 increase King & Spalding $677.5m International United States USA
42 decrease Debevoise & Plimpton $668.0m International United States USA
43 steady Foley & Lardner $667.0m National? United States USA
44 increase Paul Weiss $665.5m International United States USA
45 increase Goodwin Procter $658.0m International United States USA
46 increase Proskauer Rose $643.0m International United States USA
47 decrease Fulbright & Jaworski $642.5m International United States USA
48 decrease Slaughter & May $628.5m International United Kingdom UK
49 decrease Hunton & Williams $615.0m International United States USA
50 increase Milbank, Tweed, Hadley & McCloy $601.5m International United States USA
51 increase Wachtell $585.0m International United States USA
52 increase Covington & Burling $583.0m International United States USA
53 decrease Baker Botts $575.0m International United States USA
54 increase Cravath, Swaine & Moore $568.5m International United States USA
55 decrease Vinson & Elkins $562.0m International United States USA
56 increase Eversheds $556.5m International United Kingdom UK
57 increase Bryan Cave $555.0m International United States USA
58 increase Alston & Bird $551.0m International United States USA
59 decrease Willkie Farr & Gallagher $549.5m International United States USA
60 decrease Holland & Knight $545.5m International United States USA
61 decrease Squire Sanders $545.0m International United States USA
62 decrease Pillsbury Winthrop $533.5m International United States USA
63 increase Arnold & Porter $524.0m International United States USA
64 increase McGuireWoods $509.0m National United States USA
65 decrease Cooley Godward $507.0m International United States USA
66 decrease Wilson Sonsini Goodrich & Rosati $501.0m International United States USA
67 decrease Norton Rose $481.0m International United Kingdom UK
68 decrease Howrey $480.0m International United States USA
69 decrease Sonnenschein Nath & Rosenthal $472.5m International United States USA
70 increase Garrigues (law firm) $466.0m International Spain Spain
71 increase Nixon Peabody $465.0m International United States USA
72 decrease Ashurst $459.0m International United Kingdom UK
73 decrease Cadwalader $456.5m International United States USA
74 increase Seyfarth Shaw $453.5m National United States USA
75 increase Perkins Coie $433.0m International United States USA
76 increase Kaye Scholer $432.0m International United States USA
77 decrease Fried Frank $424.5m International United States USA
78 steady Katten Muchin $420.5m International United States USA
79 increase Quinn Emanuel Urquhart & Sullivan $419.0m International United States USA
80 increase Fish & Richardson $417.0m International United States USA
81 decrease Fidal $411.0m National France France
82 increase Locke Lord Bissell & Liddell $399.0m International United States USA
83 increase Minter Ellison $398.5m International Australia Australia
84 decrease McCarthy Tetrault $397.0m International Canada Canada
84 increase Schulte Roth $397.0m International United States USA
86 decrease Loyens & Loeff $396.0m International Netherlands Netherlands
87 decrease Mallesons Stephen Jaques $392.0m International Australia Australia
88 decrease Simmons & Simmons $391.5m International United Kingdom UK
89 increase Duane Morris $387.5m International United States USA
90 steady Allens Arthur Robinson $380.8m International Australia Australia
91 decrease Freehills $378.0m International Australia Australia
92 increase Troutman Sanders $376.5m International United States USA
93 increase Drinker Biddle & Reath $373.5m National United States USA
94 increase Littler Mendelson $370.5m International United States USA
95 increase Jenner & Block $367.5m International United States USA
96 increase Sheppard Mullin $361.0m International United States USA
97 decrease Clayton Utz $351.0m International Australia Australia
98 increase Venable $349.5m International United States USA
99 decrease Finnegan Henderson $349.0m International United States USA
100 decrease Dorsey & Whitney $342.0m International United States USA

Jesus Teaches about Worry

1) Matthew 6:25-34

“Therefore I tell you, do not worry about your life, what you will eat or drink; or about your body, what you will wear. Is not life more important than food, and the body more important than clothes?

Look at the birds in the air; they do not sow or reap or store away in barns, and yet your heavenly Father feeds them. Are you not much more valuable than they?

Who of you by worrying can add a single hour to his life?

And why do you worry about clothes? See how the lilies of the field grow. They do not labor or spin.

Yet I tell you that not even Solomon in all his splendor was not dressed like one of these.
If that is how God clothes the grass of the field, which is here today and tomorrow is thrown into the fire, will he not much more clothe you, O you of little faith?

So do not worry, saying, ‘What shall we eat?’ or ‘What shall we drink’ or ‘What shall we wear?’
For the pagans run after all these things, and your heavenly Father knows that you need them.

But seek first his kingdom and his righteousness, and all these things will be given to you as well.

Therefore do not worry about tomorrow, for tomorrow will worry about itself. Each day has enough trouble of its own.”

2) The Serenity Prayer by Reinhold Niebuhr

God grant me the serenity
to accept the things I cannot change;
courage to change the things I can;
and wisdom to know the difference.

Living one day at a time;
Enjoying one moment at a time;
Accepting hardships as the pathway to peace;
Taking, as He did, this sinful world
as it is, not as I would have it;
Trusting that He will make all things right
if I surrender to His Will;
That I may be reasonably happy in this life
and supremely happy with Him
Forever in the next.
Amen.

Driving holiday turns nightmare

By Elizabeth Soh & Jalelah Abu Baker

IT WAS supposed to have been a leisurely driving trip to a hilltop chalet in Endau Rompin National Park in Johor.

But it turned into a nightmare for 21 Singaporeans after rising flood waters cut off their only exit route and left them stranded in their vehicles, submerged in more than 3m of water.

To make things worse, a 1 1/2-year-old was ill and needed medical attention. But they were unable to get a strong enough cellphone signal to call for help.

Their ordeal ended only some 48 hours later when they were finally airlifted to safety by a helicopter on Tuesday.

Yesterday, three members of the group spoke to The Straits Times about their trip which had started brightly from Singapore on Saturday.

‘It was supposed to be a family trip, with colleagues and their families and friends,’ said oil sales representative Farahana Anwar Hassanuddin, 25.

‘The worst thing that we thought would happen was a flat tyre,’ added Ms Farahana, who counted her boss Andrew Fatipah, 34, and her colleague Sandhora Salleh, 27, an administrative officer, among the group.

They set out early on Saturday in four four-wheel-drive vehicles and eight dirt bikes, accompanied by three Malaysian tour guides.

The wet weather meant slippery conditions but the group managed to make the 55km ascent to the chalet in five hours.

They stayed the night at the chalet and, the next morning at about 10am, started their journey home. They had travelled about 6km and crossed one of the two bridges over Lembakoh River when a serious problem cropped up.

‘The second bridge was completely submerged in water. When we first reached it, the water was halfway up my waist; by the time we started turning around to return to the chalet, it was up to my neck and the first bridge was submerged too,’ said Mr Fatipah, director of Singapore-based firm Sapphire Oilfield Services. ‘We were basically trapped.’

Park officers were contacted via radio to help tow the cars – stuck in the muddy road – and they were able to reach the chalet five hours later.

Two cars managed to cross the submerged bridge safely but the other two cars required some effort.

At the chalet, the group contacted the police in Mersing as well as the Singapore consulate in Johor Baru via a satellite phone.

Mr Fatipah said the group was informed on Monday morning that a helicopter would arrive later in the day to airlift the toddler who had developed a high fever and was running out of milk powder.

But there was more drama to come.

In the evening, the helicopter came, but only to airlift a snake-bite victim at the chalet who was not part of their group, leaving the sick toddler and her distressed mother behind.

‘The mother was all ready to leave, carrying her bags and her daughter and standing in the rain for the helicopter,’ said Ms Farahana. ‘When the helicopter left, she just cried.’

Hearts sank when the group were told of their options: either pay RM1,600 (S$650) to rent two motorboats to ferry them back to Mersing; or wait two weeks for the flood waters to subside and the bridges to be repaired.

‘They told us if we took the boat, we would have to sign a waiver of any responsibility for our safety, and we said ‘no way’,’ said Mr Fatipah.

‘We were really desperate and so we kept calling the Singapore Ministry of Foreign Affairs for help. Eventually with their help, we were rescued.’

They spent another night at the chalet. The next afternoon, on Tuesday, a helicopter, dispatched by the Mersing Fire Brigade, evacuated them to Mersing.

There, they boarded a bus supplied by the Singapore consulate to return home.

Mr Fatipah said the group, which had never been to Endau Rompin National Park before, was not told by their tour agent that it was closed and that it was very dangerous to travel during the monsoon season.

They had booked the trip with Tristan Park, a Singapore-based company specialising in all terrain vehicle tours.

The trio said if they had known about the weather conditions, they would never have gone.

Malaysia media reported yesterday that the tour agency had applied for a permit to visit the park last Saturday but it was rejected. Calls to the agency yesterday were unanswered.

The three of them, who were back at work one day after returning from Johor, said while the trip was an experience they would never forget, it would not deter them from exploring Malaysia or its parks again.

Quote of the Week

“When I was 17, I read a quote that went something like:
‘If you live each day as if it was your last,
someday you’ll most
certainly be right.’
It made an impression on me, and since
then, for the past 33 years, I have looked in the mirror every
morning and asked myself:
‘If today were the last day of my
life, would I want to do what I am about to do today?’
And whenever the answer has been ‘No’
for too many days in a row, I know I need to change something.”

:: Steve Jobs 1955-2011 ::